~SING~

Queer. Ships queer ships (canon/non-canon). Ships het too. If you have a problem with non-canon then idek.

Workin on a thing for someone. XD I like it a bunch. :3 #teenwolf #sterek

Workin on a thing for someone. XD I like it a bunch. :3 #teenwolf #sterek

He is a GOD among men (and werewolves)

athenadark:

aubreyfaith16:

sterekmeta:

auntpol:

They shoot

image

and they shoot

image

and they blow one up

image

but He destroys one with his bare hands

image

Quietly remembers how Scott did against the berserkers. Just sayin’, True Alpha and all that.

Papa Stilinski did better than Chris, a trained hunter who actually knows all about these things though, while Papa Stilinski barely knows anything still. But that’s none of my business.

It’s interesting because a berserker would eventually fall, it’s just a super roided up human after all, it doesn’t feel pain but it should die eventually, but they turned to dust - they weren’t berserkers

but i love how papa stilinski uses the mute’s claymore to do it and how the berserker has this look on it’s skull that says “oh shit” in that way, the I can do nothing about this farewell my followers kind of way

Stiles Spark - The phone call in Mexico is so not random

athenadark:

dereksdylan:

Stiles being able to connect his phone in the Aztec temple is definitely not normal. The city was ruined by the earthquake and is in the middle of nowhere. We do have something to take note though. Even though the entire city is down, the temple sill stands. Why is that? Is it built on strong telluric currents? Is that how Stiles was able to use his powers? This comes back to the theories about Stiles being connected to the nemeton somehow. The nemton is situated on the telluric currents as well.

Stiles and electricity is something that Im very interested in. We already have two instances where he manipulated electricity. 

1. In 3x22 De-void, when Allison tried to tase him, he was able to rip it off.

image

2. In 3x18 Riddled, he was able to modify his MRI.

image

And that’s why I suspect the phone call in the finale, wasnt fluke. That’s Stiles spark coming into play. Now, does he still have the nogitsune inside him? Or did he always have the spark, but it came into the foreground coz of his possession (just like Lydia’s powers came into foreground after she was bit by Peter).

He always had it, the Nogitsune was just the tinder to bring the spark to a blaze

if you go to the rave scene in season 2, when derek tells stiles to break the mountain ash barrier he does it by waving his hand over it = telekinesis long - before he was possessed

no one else in teen wolf has broken the line like that, they’ve all done it physically

Coyote and the Fox

dereksdylan:

image

Silver Fox (a female) feels lonely and mentions this in a prayer song, and then meets the Coyote. Silver Fox makes an artistic proposal: “We will sing the world”.

image

They create the world together by dancing and singing. As they do so, the earth forms and takes shape

Milwok Mythology

(via athenadark)

athenadark:

auntpol:

snarksandsnags:

derekhaleismyhero:

thinkoutofthecube:

The tragic back-story that started it all

This is why I have trouble with Scott. This is the start of everything he does that I side-eye and question.

It’s really not even a “side eye and question” though, which I could accept to a certain point.

At this point in the narrative Scott doesn’t know Derek very well, and he’s being fed vastly different and conflicting ideas on the same subject. I could accept him questioning if the story Derek told was true or if he was being told something to gain sympathy - he was still a kid and people were dying all around him and someone he thought of as an enemy might actually be a friend and he’s confused. But that’s not what happened.

Scott didn’t question the validity of the story he was told, he accepted the story as true and decided that the horrific murder of an entire family - including CHILDREN - was the fault of the people who had been BURNED ALIVE. Not the perpetrators who had done the killing, the VICTIMS.

This is who Scott McCall is, at his core.

Do you know why Scott accepted the Hales were at fault, not the Argents who set the fire - because he wants to date an Argent - no other reason, he tells himself it’s love and all the lies we all tell ourselves when we’re 16, but the truth of it is his hormonal infatuation with Allison he decides is more important than the truth of her. And Allison didn’t even know about the fire and she would have, and did take, Derek’s side.

vampyvet:

the reactions of Stiles to Derek’s impending death have changed so much since the first time. The pain in his eyes this last time…

(Source: whovian182)

fyeahcopyright:

In the last few days, a number of Teen Wolf fanartists with stores on RedBubble have posted/tweeted about takedowns by RedBubble of some of the items in their stores. From what we’ve been told, all the items either had “Teen Wolf” in the tags, in the item or store description and/or in the item/store title; RedBubble isn’t claiming ownership of the works, and the language in the emails doesn’t say whether Viacom complained, or whether someone “authorized to act on their behalf” (namely, Redbubble themselves) cited the work as having issues.
This is not the first time RedBubble has taken down merch and sent an email to the store operator; RedBubble does this when their bots ”see” something that could be infringing (even if it isn’t) and generally RB tells the site operator that they were taken down after RedBubble ”received a complaint from [a major multinational rightsholder], the claimed owner or licensee of related intellectual property, and in accordance with Redbubble’s IP/Publicity Rights Policy.”
Back in 2003, CafePress took down fanart inspired by the Harry Potter characters from HPEF’s Nimbus - 2003 fancon store, because the site’s bot did some image recognition thing and CP’s policy was to take things down if the image matched up with images submitted by the copyright and/or trademark-holders. We replied to CafePress, explained that the works were transformative works and didn’t have any trademarks on them, and they were put back up shortly thereafter. Similar things have happened over the past 11 years. Every single popular show/film/brand/band/comic/series is included by CP and RB in their “usage review” systems.
As CP said in a recent annual report, ” We maintain content usage review systems that, through a combination of manual and automated blocks, monitor potentially infringing content of which we become aware.” Redbubble said something similar this summer:

Although we’re not required by law, we take further proactive efforts on many occasions and work closely with numerous content owners, brands and individual artists to minimize instances of third party infringement of intellectual property rights via the Redbubble marketplace. 

They don’t always notify the copyrightholders or trademark owners expeditiously; CP and RB’s bots check the images and the descriptions and take things down just because the IP owner has put their brands and sometimes their art into the CP and RB content management system. That doesn’t mean there aren’t “false positives” - the content management system doesn’t check for fair use or parodies or commentary/criticism, and we’ll explain how to make them aware of that below.
The laws in the US regarding transformative works and copyright infringement have expanded over the last decade to define more things as Fair Use - and the bots that stores like CafePress and RedBubble use have become more precise; they’re similar to “Search By Image” on google. However, the laws regarding trademark infringement in this sort of situation are relatively unchanged.
Fanart shared in the “gift economy” is fair use; we posted extensively about noncommercially distributed fanart back in January. Selling fan art may also be fair use as a matter of law, for purposes of determining whether it infringes on someone else’s copyright.  However, even if a work is fair use under copyright law, selling it in connection with someone else’s trademarks may constitute trademark infringement.
It’s not a given - it won’t always. If the marks are used descriptively, if they’re used to compare things, etc., it may not be trademark infringement. But you are less likely to get a takedown notice if you don’t include tags that are a show or film or band’s trademark - use a shortened version of the show title (TW, ST, SPN, AOS, etc.) or a ship name or a character’s last name instead.
If you do get a takedown notice and you think that what’s been taken down is fair use, you are allowed to respond and explain why the work is noninfringing. You can discuss these factors:
1. The purpose and character of the work (Is the fanart transformative? Was it made for non-commercial purposes? Selling something on RB impacts on this factor, but it’s not the only element at issue, especially if the fanart doesn’t replicate something seen on screen or in a comic strip panel.)
2. The amount and substantiality of the copyrighted work used (How much of the copyrighted work was used and why was it used? For fanart, usually little if any of the copyrighted work was used.)
3. The effect on the market of the copyrighted work (Will the work be used as a substitute for the original copyrighted work or impact the market for sales of merchandise related to the original copyrighted work?)
You also might want to include language inspired by this:

As fair use is a lawful use of a third party’s copyright, to the extent that this art uses another’s copyright, it should be deemed fair use under 17 USC 107 because it is (a) transformative and (b) does not adversely affect the market or potential market of the original work or derivative works. When determining if fair use is applicable and thus a work noninfringing, the central purpose of said investigation [into purpose and character of use] is to see … whether the new work merely “supersede[s] the objects” of the original creation, or instead adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the first with new expression, meaning, or message; it asks, in other words, whether and to what extent the new work is “transformative.” Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc., 510 U.S. 569, 579, 114 S.Ct. 1164, 127 L.Ed.2d 500 (1994), Zomba Enterprises, Inc.; Zomba Songs, Inc., Plaintiffs-Appellees, v. Panorama Records, Inc., Defendant-Appellant., 491 F.3d 574 (6th Cir. 2007).


 Takedowns like this happen all the time; they happen when they’re justifiable because someone’s uploaded a show-created poster as a Redbubble tote bag or CafePress coaster, they happen when someone “markets” their fanart using a trademark that the show’s creators or distributors own, and they happen when works are completely noncommercial and only on display. Absent other information, it’s not practical to assume that it’s part of a crackdown on specific artists or ships, and with regard to what’s happened to some Teen Wolf artists this week, it’s impossible to even know if the takedowns were because the trademarks were used, or because of the images themselves. We’d love more info, though - so if your art has been taken down on RedBubble and you weren’t using Teen Wolf - or any character names - in the tags or descriptions, and you’ve submitted a “Fair Use” counternotice, and it still hasn’t gone back up even though a few business days have passed, please let us know and we’ll see if we can learn more.
Follow FYeahCopyright for more on legal issues of concern to fandomers.

fyeahcopyright:

In the last few days, a number of Teen Wolf fanartists with stores on RedBubble have posted/tweeted about takedowns by RedBubble of some of the items in their stores. From what we’ve been told, all the items either had “Teen Wolf” in the tags, in the item or store description and/or in the item/store title; RedBubble isn’t claiming ownership of the works, and the language in the emails doesn’t say whether Viacom complained, or whether someone “authorized to act on their behalf” (namely, Redbubble themselves) cited the work as having issues.

This is not the first time RedBubble has taken down merch and sent an email to the store operator; RedBubble does this when their bots ”see” something that could be infringing (even if it isn’t) and generally RB tells the site operator that they were taken down after RedBubble ”received a complaint from [a major multinational rightsholder], the claimed owner or licensee of related intellectual property, and in accordance with Redbubble’s IP/Publicity Rights Policy.”

Back in 2003, CafePress took down fanart inspired by the Harry Potter characters from HPEF’s Nimbus - 2003 fancon store, because the site’s bot did some image recognition thing and CP’s policy was to take things down if the image matched up with images submitted by the copyright and/or trademark-holders. We replied to CafePress, explained that the works were transformative works and didn’t have any trademarks on them, and they were put back up shortly thereafter. Similar things have happened over the past 11 years. Every single popular show/film/brand/band/comic/series is included by CP and RB in their “usage review” systems.

As CP said in a recent annual report, ” We maintain content usage review systems that, through a combination of manual and automated blocks, monitor potentially infringing content of which we become aware.” Redbubble said something similar this summer:

Although we’re not required by law, we take further proactive efforts on many occasions and work closely with numerous content owners, brands and individual artists to minimize instances of third party infringement of intellectual property rights via the Redbubble marketplace.

They don’t always notify the copyrightholders or trademark owners expeditiously; CP and RB’s bots check the images and the descriptions and take things down just because the IP owner has put their brands and sometimes their art into the CP and RB content management system. That doesn’t mean there aren’t “false positives” - the content management system doesn’t check for fair use or parodies or commentary/criticism, and we’ll explain how to make them aware of that below.

The laws in the US regarding transformative works and copyright infringement have expanded over the last decade to define more things as Fair Use - and the bots that stores like CafePress and RedBubble use have become more precise; they’re similar to “Search By Image” on google. However, the laws regarding trademark infringement in this sort of situation are relatively unchanged.

Fanart shared in the “gift economy” is fair use; we posted extensively about noncommercially distributed fanart back in January. Selling fan art may also be fair use as a matter of law, for purposes of determining whether it infringes on someone else’s copyright.  However, even if a work is fair use under copyright law, selling it in connection with someone else’s trademarks may constitute trademark infringement.

It’s not a given - it won’t always. If the marks are used descriptively, if they’re used to compare things, etc., it may not be trademark infringement. But you are less likely to get a takedown notice if you don’t include tags that are a show or film or band’s trademark - use a shortened version of the show title (TW, ST, SPN, AOS, etc.) or a ship name or a character’s last name instead.

If you do get a takedown notice and you think that what’s been taken down is fair use, you are allowed to respond and explain why the work is noninfringing. You can discuss these factors:

1. The purpose and character of the work (Is the fanart transformative? Was it made for non-commercial purposes? Selling something on RB impacts on this factor, but it’s not the only element at issue, especially if the fanart doesn’t replicate something seen on screen or in a comic strip panel.)

2. The amount and substantiality of the copyrighted work used (How much of the copyrighted work was used and why was it used? For fanart, usually little if any of the copyrighted work was used.)

3. The effect on the market of the copyrighted work (Will the work be used as a substitute for the original copyrighted work or impact the market for sales of merchandise related to the original copyrighted work?)

You also might want to include language inspired by this:

As fair use is a lawful use of a third party’s copyright, to the extent that this art uses another’s copyright, it should be deemed fair use under 17 USC 107 because it is (a) transformative and (b) does not adversely affect the market or potential market of the original work or derivative works. When determining if fair use is applicable and thus a work noninfringing, the central purpose of said investigation [into purpose and character of use] is to see … whether the new work merely “supersede[s] the objects” of the original creation, or instead adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the first with new expression, meaning, or message; it asks, in other words, whether and to what extent the new work is “transformative.” Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc., 510 U.S. 569, 579, 114 S.Ct. 1164, 127 L.Ed.2d 500 (1994), Zomba Enterprises, Inc.; Zomba Songs, Inc., Plaintiffs-Appellees, v. Panorama Records, Inc., Defendant-Appellant., 491 F.3d 574 (6th Cir. 2007).

 Takedowns like this happen all the time; they happen when they’re justifiable because someone’s uploaded a show-created poster as a Redbubble tote bag or CafePress coaster, they happen when someone “markets” their fanart using a trademark that the show’s creators or distributors own, and they happen when works are completely noncommercial and only on display. Absent other information, it’s not practical to assume that it’s part of a crackdown on specific artists or ships, and with regard to what’s happened to some Teen Wolf artists this week, it’s impossible to even know if the takedowns were because the trademarks were used, or because of the images themselves. We’d love more info, though - so if your art has been taken down on RedBubble and you weren’t using Teen Wolf - or any character names - in the tags or descriptions, and you’ve submitted a “Fair Use” counternotice, and it still hasn’t gone back up even though a few business days have passed, please let us know and we’ll see if we can learn more.

Follow FYeahCopyright for more on legal issues of concern to fandomers.

fic: Derek/Stiles

heroderekhale:

a little something for Sterek Fest. werewolves are known au.

*

Stiles looks down the hall and sighs, pressing his toes against the floor, wondering how late Derek is going to be. It’s not like Derek doesn’t know they have a talk scheduled today, and it’s weird for Derek to not get in touch with him if he knows he’s going to be really late. Stiles is just about to stick his head in the office and apologise when Derek comes running down the hall, slightly out of breath and looking disheveled. Which, for Derek means his shirt is a little unbuttoned and his hair is a tiny bit out of place. Stiles shakes his head and waves a hand at Derek to get his attention.

“Where have you been? It’s about to start.”

“Sorry, sorry, I had a thing,” Derek says, running a hand through his hair. “It was an emergency, I couldn’t get out of it.”

“Everyone okay?”

“What? Yeah, no, it wasn’t a family thing.” Derek tugs at his shirt, buttoning it up and rolling his shoulders to loosen them up. “Everything’s good, Stiles, I swear.”

Stiles nods, looking Derek over and taking in the total unfairness of everything Derek is, and wait — “is that make up?” he asks, reaching over to touch the hollow of Derek’s throat.

“Hey,” Derek exclaims, taking a step back and frowning at Stiles. “What’re you doing?”

“There’s make up on your throat.”

“No there isn’t.”

“I —” Stiles shakes his head and huffs. “Forget it, we need to get in there.”

Derek takes the lead, pushing open the door to the auditorium and standing in the corner, his arms folded over his chest. When Stiles joins him, he looks away, and Stiles feels like he needs to apologise for something, but he’s not sure for what. Derek’s never been strange about Stiles touching him before, he’s welcomed it more than anything, so Stiles is thrown.

“And now, joining us for a talk about why the Werewolf - Human Relations Club is important, the people who set it up six years ago at this very school; Derek Hale and Stiles Stilinski.”

Read More

monkeyelbow:

Last commish done for Gossymer. Young Stiles and young Derek together :D

(via athenadark)

hoechlined:

based on this lovely post.

(via athenadark)